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Author Topic: Linguistics (Read 1035 times)

Online szipucsu

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Linguistics
« on: 2016.March.17. 10:36:56 »
Some years ago I was suggested to have a write-only topic here because most forum members had been annoyed by my tiring jokes and humour. I don't know if the others still can read my jokes in the "humor" topic. So, the idea turned up in the "reality", too. :D

Anyway, here's an English article about the "unit".

I preferred the original Spanish article. However they didn't translate Apple as Manzana (apple in Spanish).
Anyway, did you know that apple in Turkish means elma (very similar to Hungarian alma), and the Italian mela can be obtained from the letters of the Turkish word elma? Furthermore, the Swedish word äpple is very similar to the English apple.
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Offline pear

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Re:Linguistics
« Reply #1 on: 2016.March.17. 10:59:19 »
In Polish apple is "jabłko" or the diminutive "jabłuszko".
Contemptuously "japko" (misspelled, normally this is not written ;) ).
For example, instead of the iPhone, you can say "japkofon" ;)

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Re:Linguistics
« Reply #2 on: 2016.March.17. 11:21:35 »
In Polish apple is "jabłko" or the diminutive "jabłuszko".
Contemptuously "japko" (misspelled, normally this is not written ;) ).
For example, instead of the iPhone, you can say "japkofon" ;)
Is "usz" a diminutive suffix in Polish? Or is it not common?
Apple is very similar in most Slavonic languages I think.
Japkofon? Interesting. :D In Hungary we don't say "almafon".

I have found this. I don't know what other languages use the word "alma" (like in Hungarian) in the East. They might be Finno Ugric languages.
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Offline pear

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Re:Linguistics
« Reply #3 on: 2016.March.17. 11:25:00 »
Interesting map.
Unfortunately, diminutives in Polish are many (it is difficult to count).
This is not an easy language :)

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Re:Linguistics
« Reply #4 on: 2016.March.17. 11:34:03 »
Anyway, can you mention any words that are written in the same way in Polish and in other languages? Even if the meaning is different. I think there must be a lot of equal words with other Slavonic languages. What I know is "sto" for 100 in all the Slavonic languages, and "ja" (I) are the same in most Slavonic languages.
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Re:Linguistics
« Reply #5 on: 2016.March.17. 11:55:27 »
There are many similar words in Polish, Czech and Slovak.
Sound the same, sometimes the same are written, and mean something quite different.
For example "pokuta". In Polish it's penance, and in Czech is mandate penalty :)
It is sometimes funny and sometimes scary.
It is for example common word in Polish "szukaj" (English "search"), which the Czech considers offensive "fuck".